Home » Creating » DIY Freezer Paper T-shirts – Plus Free Printable

DIY Freezer Paper T-shirts – Plus Free Printable

Picture 300Bud’s 6th birthday was this week and to celebrate, we went to the zoo with two other families. We had 9 kids total so I thought instead of a party favor bag, I would make custom t-shirts for them all to wear. It was so helpful to have all the kids dressed in bright yellow shirts in the crowded zoo.

The project was fun and easier than I thought it would be! Here is how I did it:

You will need:

  • Freezer paper
  • A sheet of 8.5″ x 11″ cardstock
  • Scotch Tape
  • Foam brush
  • X-acto knife
  • Self-healing cutting mat
  • Fabric paint (I used Tulip Soft Fabric Paint and it worked great)
  • Iron
  • Piece of thick cardboard to fit inside your shirt

Picture 2861. I started by creating my t-shirt design on the computer. I used a nice block font that would be easy to cut out. You can download a free printable of the design I created at the bottom of this post.

Picture 2872. Then, I cut a piece of freezer paper to 8.5″ by 11″ using my X-Acto knife. I then taped it around the edges to a piece of cardstock. The shiny side was pointing down so that the dull side would receive the design. You do not need to make a mirror image of your design for this method. Just print it as is onto your freezer paper/cardstock.

Picture 2883. Then I removed the freezer paper from the cardstock and placed it on a cutting mat. Using my X-Acto, I cut out each letter on the freezer paper. For the “ROAR” part of the design, I saved all the letters so I could iron those inside the stencil.

Picture 2894. Next I ironed the freezer paper stencil (shiny side down) to the front of my t-shirt. I ironed all the “ROAR” letters inside the four sided shape too.

Picture 2905. I placed a piece of thick cardboard inside the t-shirt so the paint would not bleed through to the back of the shirt.

5. Then I used my foam brush and dabbed the paint inside the stencil until all the letters were covered completely with fabric paint (dabbing works better then stroking). I let it dry for a few hours and then gave it another coat of paint.

Picture 291

Picture 2926. I let the t-shirt dry for 24 hours and then peeled off the stencil and “ROAR” letters gently. Surprisingly, it peeled off pretty easily and left nice tight edges around the letters.

Picture 293Et viola! I actually made 9 of these shirts and cut out 9 stencils but I have heard you can reuse the stencils if you are careful while removing them. I found steps 2 and 3 to be easy enough to just do them 9 times. I love the way they turned out. My friend said that they would be their new designated “Zoo Shirts” because they make it easy to keep track of multiple little people.

Picture 294Here is a FREE printable of the “You’re Gonna Hear Me ROAR” design. Enjoy!

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4 thoughts on “DIY Freezer Paper T-shirts – Plus Free Printable

  1. Thank you for this tutorial! Just today on our way home from walk at Nature Center with friends I was thinking I needed to make matching, bright colored t-shirts for my kids!
    ~Lee

  2. You’re welcome! You should give it a try. It was really fun and easy! I think I’m going to make some more shirts for the summer. Maybe something for 4th of July? Fun stuff! 🙂

  3. Hiya. Im planning on doing something similar and Im wondering how your paint choice has held up through the wash? Thanks for the great post. -Katy

    • They did great in the wash. I have washed the shirts twice and I didn’t see that the paint had faded at all. Good luck with your project and thanks for stopping by!

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